Tunisia Africa Travel Guide - Tunisia Tourist Attractions, Tunisia Transportation, Tunisia Hotels and Accommodations

Tunisia Travel Guide

Tunisia Hotels

Tunisia Travel Informations and Tunisia Travel Guides
Tunisia Etymology
Tunisia History
Tunisia World War II
Tunisia Present-day politics
2009 National elections
Tunisia Economy
Tunisia Energy
Tunisia Transportation
Tunisia Religion
Tunisia Governorates and cities
Tunisia Military
Tunisia Geography
Tunisia Demography
Tunisia Language
Tunisia Education
Tunisia Culture
Tunisia Festivals

Tunisia Tourist Attractions
Carthage Tunisia

Dar Ben Abdallah Tunisia
Medina Tunisia
The 3 Medersas Tunisia
Colonial Houses Tunisia
La Goulette Tunisia
National Bardo Museum Tunisia
Zitouna Mosque Tunisia

Tunisia Vacation Trips
Tunisia History

Trip Holidays Tunisia offers travel tips and information for top travel places and best destinations. We feature links, resources and large selection of budget airlines, chartered planes, sea cruises, ferries, travel agencies, land transports and attractions including beaches, medical tourism, retirement homes, historical and pilgrimage tours.


At the beginning of recorded history, Tunisia was inhabited by Berber tribes. Its coast was settled by Phoenicians starting as early as the 10th century B.C. The city of Carthage was founded in the 9th century B.C. by settlers from Tyre, now in modern day Lebanon. Legend says, that Dido founded the city in 814 B.C., as retold in by the Greek writer Timaeus of Tauromenium. The settlers of Carthage brought their culture and religion from the Phoenicians and other Canaanites.

After a series of wars with Greek city-states of Sicily in the 5th century BC, Carthage rose to power and eventually became the dominant civilization in the Western Mediterranean. The people of Carthage worshipped a pantheon of Middle Eastern gods including Baal and Tanit. Tanit's symbol, a simple female figure with extended arms and long dress, is a popular icon found in ancient sites. The founders of Carthage also established a Tophet which was altered in Roman times.

Though the Romans referred to the new empire growing in the city of Carthage as Punic or Phoenician, the empire built around Carthage was an independent political entity from the other Phoenician settlements in the Western Mediterranean.

A Carthaginian invasion of Italy led by Hannibal during the Second Punic War, one of a series of wars with Rome, nearly crippled the rise of the Roman Empire. Carthage was eventually conquered by Rome in the 2nd century BC, a turning point which led to ancient Mediterranean civilization having been influenced mainly by European instead of African cultures.

After the Roman conquest, the region became one of the granaries of Rome, and was Latinized and Christianized. The Romans controlled nearly all of modern Tunisia, unlike other modern African countries, of which Rome only held the northern coast. It was conquered by the Vandals in the 5th century AD and reconquered by the commander Belisarius in the 6th century during the rule of Byzantine emperor Justinian.

Around the beginning of the 8th century the region was conquered by Arab Muslims, who founded the city of Kairouan which became the first city of Islam in North Africa. Tunisia flourished under Arab rule. Extensive irrigation installations were constructed to supply towns with water and promote agriculture. This prosperity permitted luxurious court life and was marked by the construction of new Palace cities such as al-Abassiya and Raqadda.

Successive Muslim dynasties ruled Tunisia with occasional instabilities caused mainly by Berber rebellions; of these reigns we can cite the Aghlabids and Fatimids. After conquering Cairo, Fatimids abandoned North Africa to the local Zirids and Hammadid. North Africa was submerged by their quarrels; political instability was connected to the decline of Tunisian trade and agriculture. In addition the invasion of Tunisia by Banu Hilal, a warlike Arab Bedouin tribes encouraged by Fatimids of Egypt to seize North Africa, sent the region's urban and economic life into further decline. The Arab historian Ibn Khaldun wrote that the lands ravaged by Banu Hilal invaders had become completely arid desert.

The coasts were held briefly by the Normans of Sicily in the 12th century and the following Arab reconquest made the last Christians in Tunisia disappear. In 1159, Tunisia was conquered by the Almohad caliphs. They were succeeded by the Berber Hafsids, under whom Tunisia prospered. In the late 16th century the coast became a pirate stronghold.

In the last years of the Hafsids, Spain seized many of the coastal cities, but these were recovered by the Ottoman Empire. Under its Turkish governors, the Beys, Tunisia attained virtual independence. The Hussein dynasty of Beys, established in 1705, lasted until 1957. From 1881 - 1956 the country was under French colonization. European settlements in the country were actively encouraged; the number of French colonists grew from 34,000 in 1906 to 144,000 in 1945. In 1910 there were 105,000 Italians in Tunisia.


Trip Holidays Tunisia also showcase a unique blend of travel and leisure photos and stories, updates, events and announcements about roads, shopping malls, hotels, bed and breakfast, restaurants, groceries and more. Not just a travel guide but one-of-a-kind discovery of people and places.

 


Tunisia, Africa - Tunisia Hotels - Tunisia Hotel & Suites - Tunisia Travel

Tunisia Travel Informations and Tunisia Travel Guides
Tunisia Etymology - Tunisia History: World War II - Tunisia Present-day politics: 2009 National elections - Tunisia Economy
Tunisia Energy - Tunisia Transportation - Tunisia Religion - Tunisia Governorates and cities - Tunisia Military
Tunisia Geography
- Tunisia Demography - Tunisia Language - Tunisia Education - Tunisia Culture - Tunisia Festivals
Tunisia Tourism
Tunisia Tourist Attractions: Carthage - Dar Ben Abdallah - Medina - The 3 Medersas - Colonial Houses - La Goulette
National Bardo museum - Zitouna Mosque

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